Three Things to Try in Key West

There are 3 things Key West is known for.

One is tasty, one is sweet, and one is spectacular.

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Served as an appetizer or finger food, these morsels are made of medium to large-sized sea snails known as “conch”.  These chunks of chewy meat held together by a batter mixed with peppers or spices are deep fried into crunchiness.

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The crown jewels of the Keys is this yellow citrus fruit, the main ingredient of the place’s most famous dessert.  Key lime is smaller and seedier, and has a greater acidity than most standard limes. Key limes also have a more tart and bitter flavor.

Made of key lime juice, egg yolks, and condensed milk, it was a lovely, tart-y, fluffy end to our meal.

Photo credit: Historictours.com

Photo credit: Historictours.com

Photo Credit: coolkeywest.com

Photo Credit: coolkeywest.com

Sunset Celebration at Mallory Square. Photo Credit: coolkeywest.comSunset Celebration at Mallory Square
Photo Credit: coolkeywest.com

There’s no escaping the famous Key West sunset.  You can catch it at Mallory Square gazing over local artists and vendors, outside your hotel balcony, or on the boat at the end of your Key West water adventure.  Some swear the sunset at Key West is the best they’ve even seen!

Photo credit: Expert Vagabond

Photo credit: Expert Vagabond

As warm as the sun is the camaraderie felt throughout the Keys whether it’s the waitress genially suggesting their Cuban food specialties, dancers inviting you to sway your hips to salsa, or artists sharing stories behind their masterpieces.  In Key West, living is easy, everybody is friendly, and the weather is fantastic.  Staying there for a couple of days felt similar to seeing an old friend after a long time.  Even though it’s a new environment you can’t help but feel at home.

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Que Vola from Florida

Que Vola!  (means  “What’s Up” in Cuban)

A hundred miles from Cuba, Key West is an island at the southernmost tip of Florida Keys.

An anchored concrete buoy in Key West, Florida marking one of the extreme points of the United States.

An anchored concrete buoy in Key West, Florida marking one of the extreme points of the United States.

Given its location, 90 miles from Cuba, the island was a natural port of call for Spanish-speaking fishermen, beginning in the early 1800s. Though English still dominates throughout the Keys, our friend and Irish’s new hubby Juan, who is part Puerto Rican was very at home speaking espanol with some of the locals.

Going around in a scooter is the best way to see Keys.   I specifically enjoyed the sea view and soft breeze along South Roosevelt, which was the way back to our hotel.  Most hotels can hook you up with rental companies.

My friend being taught how to drive a scooter. A first for her in 10 years.

My friend being taught how to drive a scooter. A first for her in 10 years.

Going out for a ride

Going out for a ride

Driving around a car is also uncomplicated.  Maps are everywhere and locals are more than friendly to help you with directions.

Key West is a come-as-you-are, let-your-hair-down, laid-back town of picket fences, eclectic shops, and warm personalities.  Overall, it gave such a charming vibe that managed to make even an adult club look wholesome.

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